Somnia launch in Stroud / 5th December 8pm / Museum in the Park

SOMNIA Knives, Forks, Spoons Press / Sep. 2019

About SOMNIA:

Writer Ian Seed (author of New York Hotel, a TSL Book of the Year) wrote: ‘one of the best books of poetry I’ve read this year is Maria Stadnicka’s extraordinarily vivid collection, Somnia.’

‘Stadnicka’s poetics is one of craftmanship, wherein she carefully walks the tightrope of surreal poetic metaphor and the gritty realism of investigative journalism and broadcasting.’ (Briony Hughes, writer and critic, Stride Magazine, October 2019)

‘Somnia is consistently alluring and enigmatic in its poetic voice. What compels it’s Stadnicka’s calm creativity in conveying the horrors and/or abstractions of these – her poetic voice completely comfortable in its suggestiveness: inventive, provoking, highly visual.’ (Mike Ferguson, writer and critic, International Times, September 2019)

Somnia will be launched on 5th December 2019, 8pm. Free entry.

Publisher: Knives, Forks and Spoons Press.

Editor: Alec Newman

Cover artwork: Mark Mawer

 

November, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…where once was a meadow…

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Photographs: © Maria Stadnicka, Stonehouse, 2019

The SHIFT Project / 12th – 16th Oct / St. Laurence Church

 

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The SHIFT Project started with an art installation created by the young Tasmanian artist Robin Watkins-Davies. It developed in a set of events taking place 12th-16th Oct 2019 at St. Laurence Church, Stroud, which bring together contemporary art, music, dance, exhibitions, workshops, presentations, poetry. It supports young people’s mental health, bringing awareness of the artistic potential of our movement. Further details about SHIFT and the oncoming events here.

Maria Stadnicka, October 2019

Falling / 12th Oct / Berlin Zeitgeist / at Atélier

Berliner Zeitgeist Programme / Oct.2019

Thirty years since the fall of the Berlin Wall which marked the end of the Cold War.

Performers: Maria Stadnicka, Brenda Waite, Mike Adcock and Uta Baldauf.

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Saturday 12th October at 7.30pm. Atelier, Stroud, Glos., UK.

As part of the Berlin Zeitgeist program, artist Uta Baldauf is putting on a performance event with writer and poet Maria Stadnicka, performer Brenda Waite and musician Mike Adcock to respond to the theme of falling in they own creative practice.

Come along for something unmissable. For tickets and further information click here.

Shearsman issue 121 / 122

 

Shearsman Magazine, Issue 121 / 122 edited by Tony Frazer.

 

It includes poetry by: Clark Allison, Miranda Lynn Barnes, Andrew Duncan, Adam Flint, Jeri Onitskansky, Paul Rossiter, John Seed, Andrew Taylor, Rushika Wick, Annemarie Austin, Alison Brackenbury, Chris Emery, Mark Goodwin, Alasdair Paterson, Alexandra Sashe, Robert Sheppard, James Turner, Benjamin Balint, Rachel Clyne, Gerry Fellows, Lucy Hamilton, John Philips, Kate Schmitt, Maria Stadnicka, Rimas Uzgiris, Tamar Yoseloff. Plus translations of Greta Ambrazaite by Rimas Uzgiris and Toon Tellegen by Judith Wilkinson.

Transitia Miserabilia: The Illusion and Delusion of Change

Thirty years ago, the fall of the Berlin Wall signalled the final months of the communist regime in East Europe, leading to a period of transition which culminated with the end of the Cold War.  It marked the transition from realist-socialism to democracy in all the Eastern Block states. This change required new societal structures and new political strategies, in response to the demands of a functioning democratic system. The transition from mono-party governance to political plurality was difficult and, at times, painful for all newly formed democracies, unaccustomed to rapid market and social changes.

It was as difficult for the Western side of the continent. Left without its common goal which defined the Cold War, the West began the reconfiguration of own strategies, while maintaining scepticism about the viability of the Eastern democracies. However, the European institutions began to change, putting aside old ideological conflicts and replacing them with economic alliances. Europe appeared more united around a common purpose, whilst the East-West divide went underground, driven by economic competition, by cultural misunderstanding and misinterpretation coming from both sides.

Transition is always marked by change, insecurity, doubt, pain, loss, anxiety and conflict. All transitions have similar attributes. Transition is a societal natural process which emerges when a revolution ends. Transition brings probing questions about values, beliefs and principles, forcing a society to find new answers. During this process, a society ends up reconfiguring its own institutions and the symbolic power it attributed to them or to groups of people.

Vermeulen (2010) opens another thread of discussion about transition. He proposes ‘metamodernism’ as a concept which defines the current developments in aesthethics, philosophy and arts. These developments are less and less focused on tensions between countries or religions or genders, rich or poor, young or old, black or white.

Vermeulen (2010) identifies that the contemporaneity experiences a more fundamental tension; between past and future. In his vision, our response to this transition it’s about whether ‘we settle for the same divisions, distractions and drama that passes for politics today, or whether we reach for a politics of common sense and innovation, a politics of shared sacrifice and shared prosperity’ (2010).

Transition is defined by fragmentation, a model which dominated the past decade and which has proven detrimental to the cultural space. In poetry, for instance, this fragmentation created conflict, polarisation and an artistic space unable to cope with / and to respond to, the pace of our time. Whilst poets are caught in the bubble of their own discourse, the artistic focus shifted to expand the engagement with the readership, and to find new audiences.

And one would say, it is all part of this change. Nothing wrong with it.

It’s not. But it is!

This type of transition is wrong, when the cultural space shows, as Stevenson (2000) says, that our generation of poets is ‘at the mercy of technology and in thrall to the media.’ It causes the illusion of power and relevance in a culture which has not yet defined what ‘relevance in poetry’ actually is. It is wrong, when the new generation of poets ‘proliferate under pressure to please a specialist clientele’ (Stevenson, 2000). It is wrong, as Susan Sontag remarked in 2002, when contemporary poetry begins to suffer from an ‘uninhibited display of egotism.’ It proliferates a cultural delusion defined by everything goes, everything is important, everything needs to be heard.

In 1934, Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva published the essay ‘Poets with History and Poets without History’ in which she identifies two opposing categories of poets (and poetry): ‘poets without history’ and ‘poets with history.’

The first category refers to poets preoccupied with self-expression, whilst the second category refers to poets engaged in artistic discovery and literary innovation. Tsvetaeva’s categorization is not without relevance today, more than eighty years later.

The ‘poets without history’ or ‘poets without development’ as she said, include poets consumed by personal expression.

‘Sometimes their knowledge is narrow and they come into world not to learn, but to say. They come into world to make themselves known. […] A poet without history cannot have a striving towards a goal, as his/hers poetry has no project.’

By contrast, in Tsvetaeva’s vision, ‘poets with history’ are:

’like an arrow shot into infinity. They seem to inhabit the creative will, don’t have time to turn around to look at themselves, only pressing forward.’

The process of ‘looking forward’ implies a continuous drive to innovate and explore new artistic territories. And here is our moment of metamodernism, the moment when our transition begins a dialogue between past and future. This is a cultural opportunity which rejects both illusion and delusion, preoccupied with shaping the power of its voice, rather than consumed by its own narrative.

And what kind of poetry can face such a challenge? To quote Seamus Heaney, it is a poetry which doesn’t win ‘competitions in the Irish Times or the New Statesman’ (Heaney, 1974, 2000). It is not a detailed self-interview, but a poetry which questions systems, and it reveals new interpretations of the world. This poetry becomes memorable when the writer assumes the responsibility to challenge complacency, and has the courage to experience the transformative power of change.

© Maria Stadnicka, September 2019 / Published in ‘Stride’ magazine on 15 October 2019.

The SHIFT Project: Art Transforms / 12th-18th October 2019

 

It started with one drawing, followed by an art installation, then an art exhibition.

Created by the young artist Robin Watkins-Davis, The SHIFT Project: Art Transforms is now setting the scene for outreach projects, participatory workshops based on contemporary art, well-being, music, dance and poetry.

The project is focused on creating community collaborations, bringing together art and movement, to support well-being and to improve mental health.

The SHIFT Project takes place 12-18th October 2019 | St Laurence Church, Stroud, GL5 1AP. The full programme is available here. Click here to find out more about it, to support the students, artists and to get involved.

I am delighted to support The SHIFT Project: Art Transforms. My performance inspired by the SHIFT art installation will take place on Sunday, 13thOctober at 5.30pm, at St Laurence Church. It includes texts from latest collection SOMNIA, published by The Knives Forks Spoons Press.

The SHIFT Project: Art Transforms brings together 17 local organisations and charities and 37 artists. You can make a difference and support the project here. Thank you and look forward to seeing you @SHIFT.

The SHIFT Project is also supported by: SGS College, Create Gloucestershire, Strike a Light, VRC Publishing and Curating, CORE Lighting, Barnwood Trust, Diocese of Gloucester, Stroud Sacred Music Festival, Arts Award, School of Larks, ACP, Stroud Visual Arts (SVA), Bliss by Robin, Stroud Yoga Space, Look Again, Fair Shares, Gloucester Gateway Trust & All Pulling Together.

Maria Stadnicka, 2019