Vertical Takeoff

On 1st October 1972, having just left the Soviet Union, Joseph Brodsky wrote in New York Times a five-thousand words article in which he condemned the political climate in Europe, and worldwide, evaluating its dangerous principles and hunger for domination and destruction. Brodsky expressed his scepticism in reference to all ‘political movements’ which he described as ‘structured methods used to avoid personal responsibility.’

Brodsky defended his belief in a different, and superior, system built on ‘personal movements – movements of the soul when a man who looks at himself is so ashamed that he tries to make some sort of change.’ The article, translated from Russian by Carl Proffer, appeared tangled, verbose and aimless; it sounded like so many other disoriented voices coming from dissidents and defectors of the era, but those who managed to read it in full recognised its unswerving accuracy in describing a failing world system.

Seamus Heaney called it a moment of literary ‘vertical takeoff’, crucial in establishing the capacity of language to go farther and faster than expected and thereby provide an escape from the limitations and preoccupations of the self.

It was, in itself, a warning signal that politics became a psychological danger for humanity, as it engaged people in external fights with the Evil, which automatically made them begin to identify themselves with the Good. And when mankind begins to consider itself bearer of Good, it slides into self-congratulation. This is a state of complacency which Brodsky, who was stateless in 1972, saw it as the source of everything that was radically bad about people.

Brodsky carefully re-considers the role of a united writing community which is vital in opposing official points of view and which should support ‘personal movements’ by engaging with our society in real exercises of reflection and learning.

Brodsky, J. (1972) ‘A writer is a lonely traveler’. In: New York Times, 1st October 1972. Available here.

Brodsky, J. (1997) On Grief and Reason. Essays. London: Penguin Books.

© Maria Stadnicka 2020

Art Climate

Sculpture © Khalil Chishtee

Artist Khalil Chishtee creates work from discarded plastic bags, expressing feelings of sorrow, dejection and even victimhood. He creates art from used plastic bags and he believes that art needs to lead to self-discovery and to a deeper understanding of ourselves and others.

Before the climate change entered the public debate, Chishtee (2010) reflected on the notion of recycling in some cultures which was not directly linked to environmental awareness, but with human greed. He referred to his experience and life in Pakistan, before moving his studio in the US.

Interesting interview with Khalil Chishtee, published in Art Now: Contemporary Art of Pakistan.  He currently lives and works in both US and Pakistan.

More information about his work and major biennales participation are available here.

© Maria Stadnicka, 2020

Kafka

© JStadnicki, 2019. London.

 

The other day, during an afternoon nap,

a tramp came to my door with a letter

for the man in apartment three, ground floor.

 

The knock made me jump, then I thought

I could give out some change in return,

but the beggar refused; he was holding

a bunch of keys and left saying ‘till tomorrow.

 

When I opened the envelope, lying flat

in my bunk, a pair of handcuffs and

steel neck chains dropped on my chest.

 

(from Somnia, out now at Knives, Forks and Spoons Press, 2020)

© Maria Stadnicka 2020

 

Book available here.

Reviews available in International Times and Stride Magazine.

In queue for ice

The poem ‘City’ from Imperfect, 2017, Yew Tree Press, UK.

Music © Katie McCue 2017

Images © World War One Archive

© Maria Stadnicka 2020

Duende

© JStadnicki, 2020

It looks like a lorry’s parked outside, just by a flower pot. I am arguing with online friends about class differences, ideologies, lack of revolutionary zeal, young-black versus white-old. Reversing over the pot, the lorry crashes into my neighbour’s house. I pause the argument to look for a quote from On Disobedience in the pile of books due to go to charity shops. Police and fire brigade should be on their way. There might be questions needing answers about circumstance, and whether anybody tried changing the course of events. My neighbour and I, maybe the driver, would have. The writer of this account would have too, by swiftly changing the lorry’s position from here, to somewhere at the far back of the landscape. Yet some would argue that for centuries barbarism solved all our problems by force and violence, proving to be such a success.

© Maria Stadnicka 2020

CRASH #2 CARDIFF

Saturday, 15 February 2020 at 19:30 / @ The Flute and Tankard, 4 Windsor Place, CF10 3BX.

This is the second night of CRASH – Cardiff’s brand new poetry night with a passion for the weird, funny, imaginative, dark, experimental and dreamy.

A fantastic lineup of poets awaits – Luke Kennard, Jess Mookherjee, Thomas Stewart, Peter Daniels, David Turner and Maria Stadnicka.

There will also be open mic slots.

The event is entirely FREE and there will be open mic slots.

Come, drink, bring friends, enjoy!

Hierarchies

 

Artwork © Mark Mawer, 2017

 

I inherit a house at the edge

of wild forests where I rarely go.

 

There will come a time when lost,

walking the back streets of memory,

 

I check every gate for a way out.

Only one door handle fits my palm.

 

A found story I never thought

I was missing; my home, dark

 

monument recognises my hand.

God forbid this mistake of certainty,

 

for it brings familiarity of place,

it reduces everything to beginnings

 

until I admit that what is gone is taller

than me, louder, and always right.

 

Ask Jonah. He would say the same:

People see monuments as lessons of hierarchy.

 

They decide the order of things

according to confining walls.

 

© Maria Stadnicka, 2020